Sun and Moon, July 2015

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The sun’s height in the sky is now past its highest point for this solar orbit.  For the next several months, it appears lower in the sky each day at noon.  As the noontime height lowers, the length of daylight decreases at the mid-northern latitudes.  At the latitude of Chicago (42 degrees N), the length of daylight decrease by nearly 45 minutes during July.  At month’s end the length of the day is about  14.5 hours.

On July 6, our planet reaches the farthest point in its revolution from the sun.

Sun

 

NASA Photo

NASA Photo

Moon

Phase Date/Time Moonrise Moonset
Full Moon 07/01/15 (9:20 p.m.)07/31/15 (11:04 p.m.) 7:59 p.m.7:27 p.m. (07/30) 6:06 a.m. (07/02)6:00 a.m. (07/31)
Last Quarter 07/08/15 (3:24 p.m.) 12:06 a.m. 12:59 p.m.
New Moon 07/15/15 (8:24 p.m.) 5:17 a.m. 7:54 p.m.
First Quarter 07/24/15 (11:04 p.m.) 1:53 p.m. 12:43 a.m. (07/25)
Times are Central Daylight Time for Chicago, Illinois,
from US Naval Observatory calculations. (For mjb)

Notice the table above shows two full moons in this month, the so-called “Blue Moon” effect.  The moon does not turn blue in this meaning; rather it refers to the infrequency of an event.  The name has other meanings as well.  A similar effect occurs during January 2018.  These moons must occur during months with 31 days.  Additionally, it is possible for February not to have a full moon because a month of phases takes 29.5 days.

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On the evening of July 18, the crescent moon appears about 1 degree below Venus and nearly 7 degrees from Jupiter.  The two planets are nearly 6 degrees apart.

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On the evenings of July 25 and July 25, the moon appears near Saturn.  On the chart above (July 26), the moon is about 9 degrees to the left of Saturn.  On the previous night, the moon is 4 degrees to the right of Saturn.

Venus and Jupiter, June 30, 2015

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Brilliant Venus and bright Jupiter are at their closest this evening as seen from the Chicago area.  They appear less than an apparent moon diameter apart.

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Venus is over 11 times brighter than Jupiter.

 

For more about the conjunction, see this summary article.

See this article for more as Venus as an Evening Star.

Venus and Jupiter, June 29, 2015

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Brilliant Venus and bright Jupiter gleam from the western sky this evening as seen from the Chicago area. The pair is about 3/4 degree apart this evening and Venus is nearly 11.5 times brighter than Jupiter.  Tomorrow night is the closest of this Great Epoch Conjunction of 2015 when the planets are half the separation they are this evening.

For more about the conjunction, see this summary article.

See this article for more as Venus as an Evening Star.

Venus and Jupiter, June 23, 2015

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Just one week before the Great Epoch Conjunction of 2015, brilliant Venus is 4 degrees from Jupiter in the western sky as seen from the Chicago area.   The star Regulus is about 10 degrees to the upper left of Jupiter.  Venus is over 10 times brighter than the Giant Planet as Venus approaches its greatest brightness during this evening appearance.  On June 30, Venus and Jupiter appear nearly 15 times closer than they are tonight!

For more about the conjunction, see this summary article.

See this article for more as Venus as an Evening Star.

Venus and Jupiter, June 21, 2015

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On this solstice evening, brilliant Venus and bright Jupiter shine from the western sky as seen from the Chicago area.  Just 9 days until the Great Epoch Conjunction of 2015, the planets are 5 degrees apart tonight.  Venus is 10 times brighter than Jupiter.

For more about the conjunction, see this summary article.

See this article for more as Venus as an Evening Star.

Venus, Jupiter and Moon, June 19, 2015

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Venus, Jupiter and the moon shine through the clouds this evening.  (To see Jupiter, click the image to see it larger.  The planet appears to the left of its name label on the image.) Venus and Jupiter are 6.5 degrees apart with the moon 7 degrees below Venus.  Tonight we are 11 days before the Great Epoch Conjunction of 2015, when the two planets appear less than an apparent full moon diameter apart.

For more about the conjunction, see this summary article.

See this article for more as Venus as an Evening Star.

Venus and Jupiter Tonight, June 8, 2015

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Brilliant Venus and bright Jupiter shine from the western sky this evening as seen from the Chicago area.  Just 22 days before the 2015 Epoch Conjunction, the planetary pair is 14 degrees apart tonight with the star Regulus 12 degrees to the upper left of Jupiter.  Venus is 9.5 times brighter than the Jupiter. A week from tonight they appear 9 degrees apart.

For more about the conjunction, see this summary article.

See this article for more as Venus as an Evening Star.

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